Computing, Big Data and How it Informs Healthcare

As part of Bletchley Park Week 2018 Clare Bankhead and Sarah Stevens will be giving presentations on ‘Computing, Big Data and How it Informs Healthcare’.

There will be two presentations, on different aspects of the management of vast volumes of medical data and the influence these have on medicine today.

The explosion in medical research necessitates the use of clear methods to identify and collate good quality evidence. The science of systematic reviews and meta-analyses has been revolutionised by the increasing availability of first, physically large computers and now hand held devices.  This presentation, by Associate Professor Clare Bankhead, will focus on the development and impact of the digital age on Evidence-Based Healthcare.

Data is often considered “Big Data” if it can be described in terms of the “four V’s”: volume, variety, velocity and veracity. Dr Sarah Stevens will address how routinely collected healthcare data fulfils these criteria and how it can be harnessed to answer questions in Evidence-Based Healthcare. In particular, the talk will highlight examples of research that can only be carried out using “big data”, with a focus on treatment for hypertension.

All are welcome to join us for this talk, booking is required. To book your free place please book here. Refreshments will be served from 17:00, the talk will begin at 17:30.

Speakers

Clare Bankhead is an epidemiologist with a special interest in statistics and research design, and is based in the Department of Primary Care Health Sciences. She has over 20 years experience in medical research utilising a vast range of different methodological approaches including RCTs, epidemiological studies, qualitative methods, systematic reviews and individual patient data (IPD) systematic reviews and meta-analysis.

Sarah Stevens works as part of the Department’s Clinical Practice Research Datalink (CPRD) working group. We provide researchers across the University with advice and support regarding use of CPRD GOLD, an electronic health records database from UK general practices.